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Dementia care home staff wear PJs too to signal bedtime

PUBLISHED: 19:00 29 November 2019

The trial is to aimed at helping residents, who may be confused, realise it is night-time Picture: BEECHES RESIDENTIAL HOME

The trial is to aimed at helping residents, who may be confused, realise it is night-time Picture: BEECHES RESIDENTIAL HOME

BEECHES RESIDENTIAL HOME

Care home staff on the night shift have ditched their traditional uniform for pyjamas to make it less confusing for patients with dementia.

The Beeches is a specialist dementia care home Picture: BEECHES RESIDENTIAL HOMEThe Beeches is a specialist dementia care home Picture: BEECHES RESIDENTIAL HOME

The Beeches Residential Home, in Ixworth, is trialling the initiative with the aim of providing a visual cue to residents that it is time for bed, helping them to settle happily for the evening.

For many people living with dementia it can be confusing and disorientating to get ready for bed or wake in the middle of the night and see care staff working.

So, by wearing PJs, the home hopes it will remind residents that it is night-time, helping them to get back to sleep.

Bev Shave, deputy manager of The Beeches Care Home, which is a dementia specialist home, said: "With many of our residents living with the later stages of dementia, we appreciate how confusing it must be to get ready for bed when a care worker is in a day-time uniform.

Staff at Beeches care home in Ixworth are wearing their PJs for the night shift to help residents with dementia Picture: BEECHES RESIDENTIAL HOMEStaff at Beeches care home in Ixworth are wearing their PJs for the night shift to help residents with dementia Picture: BEECHES RESIDENTIAL HOME

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"Many individuals with dementia regularly struggle with sleep deprivation, which then leads to irritability and mood swings the next day, along with a lack of energy.

"We're hoping that this trial will reduce their stress at bedtime and help them feel more at ease about going to bed.

"The quality of life for our residents is of the utmost importance to us. So, by improving sleeping patterns, we're hoping to increase the happiness of our residents."

PJs for dementia -  Bev Shave, deputy manager of The Beeches Care Home, with a colleague Picture: CONTRIBUTEDPJs for dementia - Bev Shave, deputy manager of The Beeches Care Home, with a colleague Picture: CONTRIBUTED

Dementia is an illness caused by damage to the brain by other diseases, such as Alzheimer's.

Symptoms often include memory loss and difficulties with problem-solving or thinking.

According to the Alzheimer's Society, around 850,000 people are living with dementia in the UK.

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