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Find out which historic sites are deemed 'at risk'

PUBLISHED: 09:07 17 October 2019 | UPDATED: 09:07 17 October 2019

The Electric Theatre in Harwich  Picture: HISTORIC ENGLAND

The Electric Theatre in Harwich Picture: HISTORIC ENGLAND

HISTORIC ENGLAND

An early 20th century former cinema, lighthouses and a former atomic bomb inspection shed are just some of the East Anglian landmarks to be added to or removed from a register of at-risk historic sites.

Dovercourt lighthouses and causeway at Harwich  Picture: JAMES DAVIESDovercourt lighthouses and causeway at Harwich Picture: JAMES DAVIES

Historic England has revealed the historic buildings it says are most in danger of being lost forever through neglect, decay or inappropriate development with its annual Heritage at Risk register 2019.

This year a total of 42 buildings in the east of England have been added to the register.

They include the Electric Palace Cinema in Harwich, one of the oldest purpose-built cinemas to survive.

Opened in 1911, it still has the screen which showed silent movies and the original projection room, its original plaster ceiling and its ornamental frontage still relatively intact.

St John the Baptist church at Needham Market, which has been removed from the Heritage at Risk register by Historic England  Picture: PATRICIA PAYNESt John the Baptist church at Needham Market, which has been removed from the Heritage at Risk register by Historic England Picture: PATRICIA PAYNE

A National Lottery Heritage Fund grant-aided project is on-going although it was put at risk when asbestos dust was discovered on the top of the fibrous plaster ceiling.

Also added to the list are the Dovercourt lighthouses and causeway in Harwich, and the Harwich treadwheel crane.

The Dovercourt lighthouses are 19th century prefabricated structures but a survey in 2018 found their fabric was deteriorating.

Historic England say they were a milestone in the history of lighthouse design and in the sequence of navigational aids.

St Mary's church in Yaxley, Suffolk, which has been added to the Heritage at Risk Register  Picture: GOOGLE MAPSSt Mary's church in Yaxley, Suffolk, which has been added to the Heritage at Risk Register Picture: GOOGLE MAPS

The Harwich Treadwheel Crane is thought to have been erected in 1667 on the orders of the Duke of York and is believed to be the earliest surviving example of its type in England.

It is now the sole visible element of the 17th century naval dockyards which developed as a supply base during the Spanish and French wars of the 15th and 16th centuries.

However a total of 39 buildings have been removed from the list, including Building 58 at the former RAF Barnham atomic bomb store at what is now the Gorse industrial estate at Barnham, near Thetford.

It was used as a bomb inspection shed during the 1950s and has now been preserved thanks to an on-going maintenance and repair programme with English Heritage.

This Grade II* timber-framed barn near Mark Teys Hall at Marks Tey, near Colchester was built around 1525 and has been added to the Heritage at Risk Register 2019  Picture: HISTORIC ENGLANDThis Grade II* timber-framed barn near Mark Teys Hall at Marks Tey, near Colchester was built around 1525 and has been added to the Heritage at Risk Register 2019 Picture: HISTORIC ENGLAND

The register provides an annual snapshot of the critical health of England's most valued historic places and those most at risk of being lost.

'Our heritage needs to be saved'

Tony Calladine, regional director for Historic England in the East of England said: "The message is clear - our heritage needs to be saved and investing in heritage pays.

"It helps to transform the places where we live, work and visit, creating successful and distinctive places for us and for future generations to enjoy, but there is more work to do.

The Wickham Bishops timber trestle railway bridge at Maldon, the last surviving bridge of its kind in England  Picture: HISTORIC ENGLANDThe Wickham Bishops timber trestle railway bridge at Maldon, the last surviving bridge of its kind in England Picture: HISTORIC ENGLAND

"There are buildings still on the Heritage at Risk Register that are ideal for rescue and capable of being brought back into meaningful use and generating an income, contributing to the local community and economy.

"Historic England's experience shows that with the right partners, imaginative thinking and robust business planning, we can be confident in finding creative solutions for these complex sites."

Over the past year, Historic England has spent £1,637,473 in grants across the east of England.

Added to the Heritage at Risk register in Suffolk:

- St Mary's Church, Yaxley

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- St Edmund's Church, Hargrave

Saved from the Heritage at Risk register:

- Church of St John the Baptist, Needham Market

- Building 58, former RAF Barnham atomic bomb store, Barnham

- Bowl barrow known as How Hill, east of Heronfield Belt, Icklingham

- Enclosure east of Nether Hall, Harkstead

- Interrupted ditch system west of Hall Farm, Kedington

- Bowl barrow 990m south west of Cranhouse Farm, Eriswell

Remaining on the Heritage at Risk Register:

- Haverhill Hamlet Road, Haverhill

- Church of Our Lady Star of the Sea, Lowestoft

- St John's church, St John's Street, Bury St Edmunds

- Baylham Roman site, Coddenham

- Sites north west and south east of Fornham All Saints, Fornham All Saints and Hengrave

- East Low Hill tumulus, Rushbrooke with Rougham

- The Umbrello folly, Great Saxham Hall, Great Saxham

- Whaley's farm house, South Elmham

Buildings added to the At Risk register in Essex:

- The Dovercourt Lighthouses and Causeway, Harwich

- Harwich Electric Palace Cinema

- The Harwich Treadwheel

- Wickham Bishops timber trestle railway viaduct

- John Webb's Windmill, Thaxted

- Barn south of Marks Tey Hall, Marks Tey

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