The areas with the highest and lowest coronavirus infection rates

Felixstowe high street at 1.30pm on the first day of the new Tier 2 coronavirus restrictions. Pictur

The latest coronavirus infection rates by neighbourhood have been revealed using an interactive map (stock image) Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND - Credit: CHARLOTTE BOND

The parts of Suffolk and north Essex hit hardest by coronavirus in the past week can be revealed using an interactive map showing the latest infection rates by neighbourhood.

Figures published by Public Health England on Saturday night indicate that the Suffolk area of Leavenheath, Nayland and Boxford recorded the highest rolling seven-day infection rate per 100,000 people for the week to December 28.

The map below divides Suffolk and north Essex into neighbourhoods called MSOAs, each made up of around 7,000 people.

Several north Essex areas, predominately in Braintree, recorded rates above 1,000 cases per 100,000 people, which is more than double the England average for that week of around 350 per 100,000. 

Clacton Bocking's Elm and Old Heath & Rowhedge near Colchester had infection rates above 800.

With 54 cases identified in the week to December 28, up 18 from the previous week, Leavenheath, Nayland and Boxford recorded an infection rate of 646.3 per 100,000 people. 

Belstead Hills in Ipswich was second highest in Suffolk with 38 positive tests (up 13 on the previous week) and an infection rate of 588.2 per 100,000.

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Great Cornard had 56 cases in the week to December 28, an increase of four on the previous week, giving it a rolling rate of 574.3 per 100,000 people.

At the other end of the scale, Harwich and Dovercourt had the lowest rate of 76.6 per 100,000 people, with five cases registered in the same time frame. 

Lakenheath was second lowest with 90.7 infections per 100,000 people and seven cases, while Needham Market & Great Blakenham was also far lower than average with 92.3 per 100,000 and nine new infections.

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